Blythe House Hospicecare is continuing to provide the highest levels of care and support to local people who are affected by life-limiting illness, bereavement and the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

We are here to help and here to stay throughout the duration of the national lockdown and beyond. The hospice, based in Chapel-en-le-Frith, is providing services across the local community.

From July to September, the expert and compassionate team delivered over 3,100 hours of palliative and end of life care in the comfort of patient’s homes – with 98% of people dying in the place of their choice at home with their loved ones.

Usually face-to-face support groups for carers, people who are bereaved and those who are affected by prostate and breast cancers, have been taking place monthly via online platform, Zoom with an average of 12 attendees per session.

During quarter three, the counselling and bereavement team delivered over 120 support sessions for local adults and children, including 42 Covid-19-secure face-to-face meetings. Hospice staff also provided over 670 telephone or online support sessions.

Louise Furmston, community engagement lead at Blythe House Hospicecare, said: ‘There has been huge concern and anxiety with patients who have experienced “multiple losses” as a result of both living with a life-limiting illness but also the limitations that the pandemic has enforced.

‘The impact of not being able to have human contact with family or friends, and not being able to access usual avenues of support, including visiting us at Blythe House, has been huge. Other worries include the uncertainty of when the situation might improve; the ever-changing guidelines; difficulties accessing healthcare services, or treatments being cancelled or delayed; as well as issues with managing symptoms like pain, nausea, fatigue and breathlessness.

‘At Blythe House, whilst government rules have stopped us from undertaking our usual events and services, they would never stop us from providing the highest quality care, advice and support to local people who are affected by life-limiting illnesses, such as cancer, COPD, heart failure and motor neurone disease.’

Alongside the staff team, the hospice’s dedicated volunteers have continued to go above and beyond to support local people affected by Covid-19.

Vicci Wild, community volunteer programme manager, said: ‘Our amazing volunteers continued to fulfil every request for support throughout July to September; 63 socially-distanced garden visits took place providing companionship to patients and support for carers. The team worked with people who were no longer required to isolate, by helping them regain their confidence to go out to run their own errands. As restrictions were tightened again, the team assured the community that the support from Blythe House will remain available.’

Janet Dunphy, hospice CEO, added: ‘As Dame Cicely Saunders, the founder of the hospice movement, once said “We cannot take away the whole hard thing that is happening, but we can help to bring the burden into manageable proportions.” That is exactly what we are striving to do here at Blythe House.

‘We are part of a community that is prepared to help; there is a strong culture of self-reliance in the High Peak, and the nurturing element of what Blythe House does is a direct reflection of the community that supports us. Together with district nurses, GPs and other local healthcare providers, we are able to wrap around those who need us. We know that to stay relevant, solvent and keep to our mission, we must stay together, work in partnership with others and embrace social change.  We are stronger together, clear of purpose and very proud to be part of the High Peak community.’

To access support during the ongoing lockdown, please:

Referrals for hospice care in the comfort of patient’s homes across the Derbyshire Dales and North East Derbyshire have surged by more than 160% since Blythe House joined forces with Helen’s Trust.

Blythe House Hospicecare, based in Chapel-en-le-Frith, and Helen’s Trust in Bakewell announced their formal partnership in September, but have been working together officially since April.

The charities provide 24/7 palliative and end of life care in the homes of patients with life-limiting illnesses including cancer, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and neurological conditions like motor neurone disease.

Referrals are made to the team for a variety of reasons including respite sits so that a carer can get some much-needed rest or to run errands; to get a patient home from hospital; crisis avoidance, where a family is in need of support quickly to help with a potentially distressing or emotional situation; and for end of life care when a patient is in the final weeks or days of life.

Hospice at Home healthcare assistants have provided this care across the Dales and North East Derbyshire, including in Alfreton, Bakewell, Birchover, Bolsover, Chesterfield, Clowne, Dronfield, Eckington, Hathersage, Matlock and Shirebrook.

Dr Louise Jordan, founding trustee of Helen’s Trust, said: ‘What is so exciting about working with Blythe House, is the joint aim to provide our own highly skilled carers to give care in the comfort of patient’s homes. Helen’s Trust has always relied on contracting with agencies. This has largely been successful but gives no guarantee of the quality of care we aim for, and often can be unreliable and very expensive.

‘Lockdown fast tracked our collaboration very effectively and very efficiently. The demand for care has been massive since our collaboration and referrals have gone up by 167%. More healthcare assistants have been recruited and trained, and we are looking to expand this number further very quickly.

‘As a founding trustee, Helen’s Trust is very precious to me and I want to assure you that the board and I have every confidence that the merger of Helen’s Trust and Blythe House will enable us to help more people; to support individuals to stay and die in their own home and have a good death. This is so important for the individual but also for their family and friends.’

Ruth Brown, Hospice at Home senior manager has coordinated the implementation of care across the region. She added: ‘Our community is at the heart of everything we do here, and our healthcare assistants have gone above and beyond, providing the good honest care we strive to deliver, even though our “normal” has changed forever and some of these new patterns of working will remain.

‘I am delighted to be a part of the work of our two charities, both of which hold a special place in my heart. As Henry Ford once said: “Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.”’

Blythe House’s Hospice at Home service launched in 2016 and since then, has delivered over 50,000 hours of day and night-time care in the comfort of patient’s homes across the High Peak. Referrals can be made by:

  • Calling 01298 813007 or 01298 811770 for Blythe House
  • Calling 07780 331715 for Helen’s Trust

Find out more about the Hospice at Home service and if it might be useful for your family

A message from Janet Dunphy, our CEO, as we continue to navigate our ‘new normal’:

‘It really feels like we are in this together, that our community know how much we need their support and how much they need our services, now and in the future.

‘Community support has never been so enthusiastically given. Without our shops we could not survive as an organisation; without our shop volunteers there would be no shops. Without the money we raise, we would have to cut services. These are the facts, and I wanted to say how much that supports matters and how much you matter. Whether you need us, or you are helping us with donations to the shops or to eBay, helping to run the shops for us, or fundraise with us. Services stop when money stops, this we know and it will get tougher too.

‘During our “Here to Help” campaign during lockdown this year, with our community volunteers we supported on average 170 people per week who were isolated, scared, needing advice or practical help. With a steady stream of donations, we can continue this during these hard times. ‘People did root in their attics and cupboards and send us those small special items that we could sell on eBay; that has been massive help when the shops were closed. And the volunteers came back to open our shops, and our customers came back, pleased to see us, pleased to help us and the clinical services have carried on throughout these times, supporting everyone who needs us and getting the care out there.

‘Blythe House and Helen’s Trust together has navigated this tough time to reshape and ensure we will be here in the future, providing modern services, that at some time, we or those we know and love will need.

‘I can hear and see you fighting for our success, the pride you take in being part of your local charity is felt. It is appreciated, and it matters. Every penny you raise matters. Your ambition for your local charities is evident in everything you do, and we are here because of what you do. I just wanted to thank you. It’s always important to talk about the services we provide, but without you and the support you give whether as a retail or fundraising volunteer, in donations of money or goods, there would be no services.’

Find out more about our care and services at this time.

As of Thursday 5th November, our hospice shops are CLOSED in-line with government guidance. Christmas cards are still available to buy, please download and complete an order form and send it to Caroline Morgan: caroline.morgan@blythehouse.co.uk.

Order form

You can also order over the phone by calling: 07494072082

See designs below clockwise from top left:

Merry Christmas Santa’s
150 x 150mm
Pack of 10 £4.00

Winter Farm
150 x 150mm
Pack of 10 £3.50

Blue Christmas Tree
150 x 150mm
Pack of 10 £4.00

Silent Night, Holy Night
126 x 172mm
Pack of 10 £4.00

Local Scene
Solomon’s Temple,
Buxton
105 x 148mm
Pack of 10 £4.00

We are also immensely grateful to local businesses who are stocking our Christmas cards across the High Peak and Hope Valley – PLEASE CALL IN ADVANCE AS SOME OF THE SHOPS BELOW MAY NOW BE CLOSED DUE TO THE LOCKDOWN:

  • Chippy’s Plaice – 59 Spring Gardens, Buxton, SK17 6BJ
  • Dolly ‘n’ Ted’s Tearoom – The Stones, Castleton, S33 8WX
  • Halls Mica Hardware – 116 Market Street, Chapel-en-le-Frith, High Peak SK23 0HZ
  • Hope Chest Deli – Unit 2, 8 Castleton Rd, Hope, Hope Valley, S33 6RD
  • Peveril Stores – How Lane, Castleton, Hope Valley, S33 8WJ
  • Tea on The Green – 6aa, 3 Green Lane, Chinley, High Peak, SK23 6AA
  • The Anchor Inn – Four Lanes End, Tideswell, SK17 8RB
  • The Olive Tree Farm Shop at The Wanted Inn – A623 route, Sparrowpit, SK17 8ET

‘Without the hospice’s healthcare assistants, dad would probably have had to go into hospital, which we had always promised would not happen. Dad wanted to be in his own home with mum.’

Light up a Life in memory of someone you love.

It was in January 2019 that Blythe House began providing Hospice at Home care and volunteer support to Andrea Jeffs’ parents, Eileen and Colin Chorlton at their home in Chinley.

Andrea explained: ‘I am an only child and I grew up in Marple with mum and dad; mum was a nursery nurse and dad was a printer. I have three children of my own and a granddaughter, Willow, and I am a community care worker in my hometown; a job that I thoroughly enjoy. Mum and dad were both very active and enjoyed walking, travelling and dining out with friends.

‘In March 2005, dad suffered his first heart attack and was in Stepping Hill Hospital for several weeks. Once home, he went for rehab sessions and then joined an exercise class called Take Heart in Hazel Grove. He was doing really well and then in January 2007, he was diagnosed with bowel cancer. Doctors decided to operate but warned us that dad might not make it through the operation as his heart was very weak, but he wanted to take the risk, and he made it!

‘Dad was no longer working at this point – he had taken a back seat and needed to slow down. He was still in hospital after his cancer operation as things went wrong and his wound opened up. Surgeons couldn’t risk putting him under anesthetic again so dad became a “guinea pig” for one surgeon and they decided to try and grow new skin over his wound. He sadly contracted MRSA, a bacterial infection, and was isolated. Eventually, dad made a good recovery and he had a special corset made to protect his stomach and wound which he had to wear constantly.

‘In September 2016, mum had a heart attack and was taken to Stepping Hill. They then both went to Take Heart together, but in April 2018, dad had another heart attack and he was rushed to Wythenshawe Hospital where he ended up in the intensive care unit. We didn’t think he’d make it this time as he’d already been fitted with a pace maker and a mini-defibrillator after his previous heart attack. Hospital staff did everything and he pulled through again.

‘Dad then got an infection in October that year and that is when things were noticeably different with him. His memory was fading and I suggested to mum he was tested for dementia. Whilst all this was happening, mum had been diagnosed with skin cancer that had spread to her lymph nodes. They were operated on and mum needed immune therapy at The Christie Hospital. There were so many appointments for mum and dad, and my dad couldn’t be left on his own whilst mum was at the hospital.

‘Mum had to stay in the hospital and so I took time off work and moved in with dad to care for him. Dad was getting worse and I knew we needed some more help. The community matron and heart nurse to who came to visit my dad contacted Blythe House. Meanwhile, in December 2018, dad became very ill again but in true dad spirit, a week later he was back on his feet again, although very poorly.

‘In January 2019, healthcare assistants from Blythe House’s Hospice at Home team started to come and sit with dad whilst mum travelled to The Christie for her treatment, and I took over where I could. Dad was getting a lot of pleasure having all this attention!

‘The next month, dad started going to Blythe House in the day-care service on a Thursday, to give mum some respite. He really enjoyed himself and looked forward to going.

‘In July, healthcare assistants started to help with dad’s personal care and came in a lot more to give mum the respite she needed as dad’s dementia and mobility were getting a lot worse, and mum was also not well at all. Volunteers from the hospice started to come and sit with dad as well, and a volunteer also came to help in the garden as mum and dad were not able to keep on top of it – they had a lot of new friends!

‘In December, mum became very ill and was taken into The Christie and put into isolation for six and a half weeks over Christmas and New Year. I stopped work again and moved in with dad. Blythe House staff and volunteers still came in for personal care for dad and gave me respite, so that I could go home to my son and check things were ok there.

‘Dad’s dementia was rapidly getting worse and he was missing mum. Christmas was very different; my children came for lunch and brought Willow. Dad was over the moon to see them and we had a good lunch. I then took dad to the hospital to see mum, which was very emotional.

‘Mum came back home in January and things were very different as mum now needed carers as well. Blythe House stepped up care for dad, providing two visits a day, seven days a week, and mum had carers too. She gradually gained strength and no longer needed her carers, but the hospice team was looking out for mum too, even though they were there for my dad.

‘On the 19th May 2020, dad went downhill and couldn’t get out of bed. I was called by a hospice staff member in the morning and went straight to him. Dad was unresponsive, and the healthcare assistant was there to support mum and I. Dad sadly died on 21st May at 11.15am with us at his bedside.

‘The care and support from Blythe House was incredible and invaluable. All the healthcare assistants showed such care, respect and compassion for my parents; nothing was ever too much trouble. The volunteers were always cheerful and happy to spend time with dad when he was on his own. I personally found everyone from the hospice very friendly and supportive, and always on hand through some very difficult times.

‘With dad’s funeral taking place during the coronavirus lockdown, there was only a handful of people allowed to attend but three healthcare assistants who’d looked after dad were there, which was so lovely. We asked for donations to Blythe House in lieu of flowers, with family and friends of dad raising almost £900 for hospice care.

‘Without the hospice’s healthcare assistants, dad would probably have had to go into hospital, which we had always promised would not happen. Dad wanted to be in his own home with mum. I would have had to give up work to look after dad as mum had been so poorly and couldn’t care for him herself, even if she had been well, it would’ve been too much for her.

‘Mum and I can’t thank Blythe House enough – not just the healthcare assistants but also the friendly staff on the other end of the phone that went above and beyond at the drop of a hat to provide care, sometimes at very short notice, and also during the coronavirus period, which made things increasingly difficult.

‘This year, I will be lighting up a life in memory of my Dad, and I would love to invite you to do the same in memory of someone you love. Due to Covid-19, we were unable to give Dad the final send-off that he deserved, as many friends could not attend his funeral. By lighting up a light in his name, we are joining with all those others who have lost a loved one this year and have been unable to get together physically to remember them.

‘By lighting up a life for Dad, my donation will go towards supporting Blythe House Hospicecare’s services in the future, providing vital care to people like Dad, who wish to stay and die in the comfort of their own home with their loved ones by their side. The Hospice at Home team has supported over 100 local patients between January and September this year; enabling them to remain at home where they feel most safe.’

For a suggested minimum donation of £10, a light on the virtual Blythe House Hospicecare tree will be dedicated to your loved one, and their name will be listed in the Order of Service for the Light up a Life ceremony. You will receive an invitation to the online service to be held on Sunday 13th December at 4pm, as well as a tree hanging and your own copy of the Order of Service to keep.

Light up a Life in memory of someone you love and support local hospice care.

‘If you’re going to make a will, why not do it when the solicitor is willing to donate the fees to such a worthy cause such as Blythe House Hospicecare?’

Ali and Scott Beswick decided to make their will with Cooper Sons Hartley & Williams during Blythe House’s Wills Month in 2019.

The Buxton couple have supported the hospice with various events and fundraisers after Ali’s mum, Julie received care at Blythe House following her breast cancer diagnosis in 2018.

Here, Ali and Scott explain more about the support Julie received, the importance of writing a will, and why they chose to do so during Wills Month…

‘We knew of Blythe House before mum’s diagnosis, and were aware of some of the services the hospice offers, like counselling and respite activities at the hospice and end-of-life care at home, but we didn’t know much more than that. We didn’t realise how varied the support and activities would be or how much was available, or the extent of the support groups.

‘Julie started to access the services at Blythe House in 2018 following her breast cancer diagnosis. She received various types of support including one-to-one and group sessions, and was able to access care and advice including speaking with a financial advisor about benefit entitlements; receiving weekly physiotherapy for her feet as they suffered from the effects of chemotherapy; complementary therapy including reiki; counselling; and talking to a beautician about hair care, head scarves and wigs.

‘Julie also took advantage of the craft facilities at the hospice and had a go at some painting, book folding and tapestry as well as joining in on the Writing for Life course which enabled her to put down on paper thoughts and feelings and discuss these in the group. The sessions also enabled Julie to meet other people who have become very good friends; there is nowhere like Blythe House where you can meet and catch up with others in a similar situation. Julie also attended (pre-COVID) the monthly breast friends support group at the hospice- offering a chance to be with other people who have had breast cancer.’

A positive prognosis

‘Julie is doing very well now and has been back at work for just over a year. Her treatment is now down to once every six months and if it were not for the current restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, she would be doing pretty much everything that she was able to do before her diagnosis and treatment began. Her hair has come back too!’

Giving something back to Blythe House

Scott said: ‘Blythe House is a local charity that relies heavily on donations and fundraising to continue providing vital services to patients like my mother-in-law and families like ours. The charity is particularly close to us due to the support that they have provided to Julie and therefore, there was no hesitation to choose to run the London Marathon for the hospice (now sadly postponed until next year!) We have also taken part in the Glow Twilight Walk with our family, which was an amazing occasion.

‘When Wills Month came around, there was no hesitation; we needed to make a will and we wanted to continue our support to Blythe House and give something back ourselves.’

Making a will

Ali explained: ‘We became homeowners in 2016, got married in 2017 and had our little boy, Callum in November 2018. We had talked about making a will a number of times over the last few years but it was one of those things that we never got round to doing. I think we expected it to be a really long-winded process which we kept putting off, but when my mum received her diagnosis and when Callum was born (both in 2018), it really hit home that it was something we needed to have in place, for Callum’s future more than anything.

‘My mum picked us up a leaflet about Wills Month 2019 during one of her sessions at Blythe House, it was another reminder to make a will, and when we saw that the fees were being donated to Blythe House, we felt that if we were going to make a will, it needed to be then; so we did!’

Securing your future – making a will is so important

The couple said: ‘As uncomfortable as it is to talk about, death happens to us all and we will never know when “that day” will happen, so the sooner you make a will, the better. Having a will means that there are legal plans in place to determine what will happen to your assets (home, car, savings, everything else you own) and your family (children, pets etc.) when you are no longer here. We felt a strange sense of security and satisfaction when we made ours; as if we were securing Callum’s future.
‘The meetings with the solicitors and putting the wills together don’t actually take long, you just need to be in agreement of who you would like to act on your will (your executors), what you want to happen to particular items (or other assets) and who will receive them (the beneficiaries). Gather a list of the names and addresses of the beneficiaries and the solicitor will do the rest! Once you’re happy with the draft, you go in to the solicitor’s office for literally five minutes to sign the final document and it’s done!’

Kill two birds with one stone –write a will during Wills Month

‘Excuse the pun – kill two birds with one stone! If you’re going to make a will, why not do it when the solicitor is willing to donate the fees to such a worthy cause such as Blythe House Hospicecare? You never know; you or a family member may need to call upon Blythe House at some point; wouldn’t it be a good feeling to know that you have helped support the hospice to support you or someone you love?’

To book an appointment to make your will in October, call Cooper Sons Hartley & Williams on 01298 77511 quoting Blythe House Hospicecare.

 

Make a will with Buxton solicitors and support local hospice care

 A Buxton solicitor’s branch is set to write wills for free, in return for fees being donated to support local people affected by life-limiting illness and bereavement.

Throughout October, Cooper Sons Hartley & Williams Solicitors will be delivering a will writing service, with all the money raised coming to Blythe House.

Ali and Scott Beswick decided to make their will with the solicitor’s firm during Blythe House’s Wills Month last year. The Buxton couple have supported the hospice after Ali’s mum, Julie received care at Blythe House following her breast cancer diagnosis in 2018.

Ali said: ‘Mum is doing very well now and has been back at work for just over a year.  Her treatment is now down to once every six months and if it were not for the current restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, she would be doing pretty much everything that she was able to do before her diagnosis and treatment began.’

Scott added: ‘Blythe House is a local charity that relies heavily on donations and fundraising to continue providing vital services to patients like my mother-in-law and families like ours. The charity is particularly close to us due to the support that they have provided to Julie. When Wills Month came around, there was no hesitation; we needed to make a will and we wanted to continue our support to Blythe House and give something back ourselves.’

Ali continued: ‘If you’re going to make a will, why not do it when the solicitor is willing to donate the fees to such a worthy cause such as Blythe House Hospicecare? You never know; you or a family member may need to call upon Blythe House at some point; wouldn’t it be a good feeling to know that you have helped support the hospice to support you or someone you love?’

The suggested minimum donation to Blythe House Hospicecare during October for wills are: single will £150; mirror will (for a couple) £250; codicil (update to your existing will) £60.

To book an appointment to make your will, call Cooper Sons Hartley & Williams on 01298 77511 quoting Blythe House Hospicecare. 

Read Ali and Scott’s story.

Following Blythe House’s official partnership with fellow local end of life care charity, Helen’s Trust, Janet Dunphy, CEO, has written a blog about the news…

I was absolutely delighted when Dr Louise Jordan, Chair of Helen’s Trust board of trustees, approached me to discuss the possibility of this partnership, this is why:

As organisations, Blythe House and Helen’s Trust share the same values, we are here to support those with life-limiting illness. The growth of our Hospice at Home service proves how much people want to stay with their loved ones at home at the end of their life. We literally do the same thing for the same people in the same place. Together we do it better. It is because of this that all the trustees and staff involved are so excited and proud to be together as a community. We are a perfect match, like Blythe House, Helen’s Trust is well-loved charity; a small charity with clear ambitions to support as many people as possible when they need us most.

Our services at Blythe House are unaffected by this partnership, but I’m sure you’re pleased to see the developments that enable us to reach even more people who need us. Just as always, Blythe House works to meet the needs of our community. Blythe House is doing the same work, but more efficiently, we have to be here for the future.

The partnership also enhances our workforce, as the Helen’s Trust fundraising team join us. They have ensured Helen’s Trust has kept going and made it as well respected and successful as it is today; their work will continue as our fundraising work for Blythe House continues. I assure you that both teams are raring to go! We will continue to use the familiar and respected brands and profiles, which have defined our two great charities over the years.

We also have an opportunity to expand the work of our community volunteer services. They have made 1,600 contacts in our community, and their achievements shone brightly throughout the COVID-19 lockdown (and still do). The Helen’s Trust community will be able to join that team and support their neighbourhoods with trained volunteers from Helen’s Trust.

In essence: we are doing more – for more people – together. Raising funds has never been more important than it is today, if you are willing to help in any way please contact: fundraising@blythehouse.co.uk.

If you are interested in joining our volunteering team, please contact: volunteering@blythehouse.co.uk.

I wish you all well in these strange times and hope you feel every confidence in your local developing hospice. Thank you sincerely for helping us to be there.

Warm wishes

Janet

Blythe House is joining forces with Bakewell-based Helen’s Trust to extend Hospice at Home services to more patients across the High Peak, Derbyshire Dales and North East Derbyshire.

Blythe House Hospicecare and Helen’s Trust have been discussing their organisational compatibility for over 12 months, and this formal partnership – officially launched today, 7th of September 2020 – is the natural progression of the special relationship.

The charities have been working closely together since April throughout lockdown, delivering over 1,800 hours of care to patients across the Dales and North East Derbyshire , in addition to those in the High Peak, who have life-limiting illnesses such as cancer, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and motor neurone disease.

After receiving 120 patient referrals from April to August 2020, 75 patients died in the comfort of their own home with their loved ones by their side – achieving a 100% outcome for the patient’s preferred place of death.

The need for this fundamental care in patient’s homes has never been clearer. A survey found that 82% of people wanted to die at home, but 50% of us die in hospital. Other research found that hospices could help reduce hospital deaths by 50,000 every year, generating £80m of savings for the NHS* (*Hospice UK).

Tim Mourne, chairman of the Blythe House Hospicecare board of trustees, said: ‘Over the last year, it has become more and more apparent that Blythe House and Helen’s Trust would be stronger together; ensuring better value from joint resources, and most importantly, reaching more local people who need us.

‘I am delighted to announce that Janet Dunphy, chief executive at Blythe House Hospicecare, has officially taken on the management of both charities, following the retirement of the former Helen’s Trust CEO earlier this year, and she will continue to lead the merged organisation.

‘The board of trustees at both charities have been merged, to support the exciting new partnership and its future development, bringing together local industry professionals with a wealth of knowledge and skills.’

Dr Louise Jordan, founding trustee of Helen’s Trust, added: ‘Blythe House and Helen’s Trust are both strong and aspiring local charities whose shared vision is to support more and more people, to have the choice to stay and die in their own home. Working together accomplishes this and provides a very high standard of care.

‘As a board, we are so incredibly glad that over the last year we have forged such strong links with Blythe House who share the same purpose and values. The COVID-19 pandemic has hit us like a tornado but a clear sentiment between the two charities is that together, we are stronger.’

Janet Dunphy, CEO at Blythe House Hospicecare, has over 35 years’ experience as an end of life care specialist. She commented: ‘I am delighted to have the opportunity to oversee this incredibly exciting partnership, to ensure that everyone in our local community can receive the best Hospice at Home care.’

Blythe House’s Hospice at Home service launched in 2016 and since then, has delivered over 48,000 hours of day and night-time care in the comfort of patient’s homes across the High Peak.

Referral processes for both charity’s services will remain the same and can be made by:

  • Calling 01298 813007 or 01298 811770 for Blythe House
  • Calling 07780 331715 for Helen’s Trust

Cover image – Tim Mourne, Janet Dunphy and Dr Louise Jordan 

Read a blog post from Janet Dunphy, CEO, about the news.

Lovers of the great outdoors across the High Peak are being invited to support their local hospice as they go outside to run, walk, swim or bike.

We’re asking people to help raise vital funds by enjoying an outdoor activity and donating just £5.00 to hospice services.

Alistair enjoying a day at the zoo with his family to commemorate #GoOutsideDonateFive

Alistair Rogerson, business development manager, said: ‘Understandably, the coronavirus pandemic has hit the hospice hard, as we had to close our charity shops and cancel or postpone our fundraising events. We would love for local people to get behind this new fundraising initiative to help raise money for hospice care in the community.

‘Everyone can get involved by doing something fun outdoors – it could be hiking, biking, swimming, climbing, or simply walking the dog. If just 50 people took part and donated only £5 each, the total amount would pay for a specialist clinic for anyone in the community with heart or respiratory problems to get the care, advice and medication that they need.’

To get involved, simply text OUTSIDE to 70085 to donate £5 to Blythe House Hospicecare, and tag posts on social media #GoOutsideDonateFive.

Texts cost £5 plus one standard rate message and you’ll be opting in to hear more about our work and fundraising via telephone and SMS. If you’d like to give £5 but do not wish to receive marketing communications, text OUTSIDENOINFO to 70085.

You can also donate online via our website.